Travel

What’s your definition of a ‘Masshole?’

We want to know your thoughts about the term.

Suzanne Kreiter/Globe Staff
Heavy traffic in Massachusetts in 2021.
Suzanne Kreiter/Globe Staff

You’ve probably heard the term “Masshole,” but what does it truly mean?

Fodor’s Travel hashes it out in a recent post, “Planning a trip to Boston soon? Prepare to meet some Massholes,” which was written by a self-described “LLBean-wearing, Dunkin’-drinking, Oyster-shucking New Englander” on social media.

The word was added to the Oxford Dictionary in 2015, where it is defined as “a term of contempt for: a native or inhabitant of the state of Massachusetts.”

“[T]hough most of us know it with a specific meaning,” wrote the Fodor’s author. “Reserved for aggressive or clueless drivers who cause many of the transport pains in the state, the term applies to drivers who cut others off, turn without a signal, and stop abruptly for no apparent reason.”

Advertisement:

Dalton DeLima, or “The Proper Masshole,” as he describes himself online, has more than 80,000 followers on TikTok and posts popular videos about traffic and driving, among other local content about Massachusetts.

But the term is subjective, according to the Fodor’s article.

“New Englanders can’t seem to agree on who is most deserving of the brand,” Fodor’s wrote. “For example, author Matt Ridley referred to Massholes as the transplants who migrated up to New Hampshire. Farther up north in Maine, Masshole is used as a snide noun for the summer weekenders. In Massachusetts, it’s used for other drivers on the road or, interestingly, as a term of endearment.”

What is your definition of a “Masshole?”

Share your thoughts in the form below, or send us an e-mail at [email protected]. Your response may be used in an upcoming Boston.com article and/or social media channels.

What defines a Masshole?

Are you a Masshole?(Required)
What defines a Masshole?
Your neighborhood/town may be published.
What are your preferred pronouns?
Please select your preferred pronoun so we may correctly refer to your response in an article.
Please enter an email address and/or phone number that we can easily contact you with. We may reach out for more information. It will NOT be published.